News and Press

Strategy: Puma Gets Running Start in 2003 With Worldwide Push for H. Street

01/06/2003

Strategy: Puma Gets Running Start in 2003 With Worldwide Push for H. Street
01/06/2003

German-based athletic footwear & apparel company Puma takes on a Jamaican flair.

German-based athletic footwear and apparel company Puma will take on a Jamaican flair beginning this month in ads for H. Street, a new colorful running shoe designed for high-impact use on city streets and high school tracks.

The integrated TV and print campaign will run in North America, Europe and Asia, via Quaker City Mercantile, Philadelphia, but U.S. consumers will only see the print component. Budget was not disclosed. Puma spent $3.3 million in the U.S. from Jan.-Sept. 2002, per CMR.

The campaign builds on the relationship between the trendy athletic brand and the Jamaican people through the color, music and passion of the island's culture and Puma products. Puma last year signed a multi-year sponsorship contract with the Jamaican National and Olympic teams and will supply apparel and footwear through 2008.

Print breaks in the U.S. with four executions in March issues of Details, Black Book, Flaunt, Interview, The Fader, Vibe and Nylon. One image features two elderly Jamaican women dressed in their Sunday finest, complete with vibrant Puma H. Streets. Another shot shows an athlete running through the streets triumphantly carrying an oversized Jamaican flag wearing matching H. Streets.

The TV spot, which will air in 15-, 30-, 45- and 60-second versions, shows a Jamaican man strolling down the beach when he discovers a magic lamp and a hip Genie who grants his wish that everyone have a pair of shoes just like the Genie's vibrant H. Streets. Across the island, shoes are replaced, from the dancing feet of a gospel choir in rehearsal to a bus full of passengers and a woman at home ironing.

The tag reads, "Puma, the proud sponsor of the Jamaican National Team."

The unisex H Street shoes will be available this spring for $70.

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Strategy: Puma Gets Running Start in 2003 With Worldwide Push for H. Street

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NY Times Hendrick's Gin Recipe

01/05/2003

NY Times Hendrick's Gin Recipe
01/05/03

"Hendrick's Gin Gibson"

Ingredients
* 3 ounces of Hendrick's gin
* A touch of dry vermouth
* Cocktail onions
Preparation
1. Chill martini glass. Fill shaker with ice. Pour in gin. Add vermouth. Cover and shake.
2. Put several cocktail onions on a stick and place in chilled glass. Pour cocktail over onions and serve.

YIELD
1 serving

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NY Times Hendrick's Gin Recipe

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Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) (formerly Quaker City Mercantile) Featured in Philadelphia Business Journal

01/03/2003

Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) (formerly Quaker City Mercantile) Featured in Philadelphia Business Journal
01/03/2003

Flux was the buzzword for publications and agencies this year.

The past year for the marketing and media industries was, in a word, challenging. Like the economy in general, though, unexpected players seemed to emerge from the pack.

Case in point: Agencies like Red Tettemer and Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) continued to grow.

Red Tettemer leveraged its work for Comcast into work for New York-based Cablevision. It dominated the Philadelphia Ad Club's Addy awards, picking up 11. It also moved from Narberth into one of the more unusual agency headquarters, converting John Wanamaker's opulent, two-story penthouse suite atop One South Broad, filling it with thrift-shop furniture and eBay art and creating offices by using aluminum-and-glass "store fronts."

Ed Tettemer, the wild-haired president of the agency, cultivates an image of eccentricity. Staffers are required to learn his 11 rules of advertising, one of which is, "Own the client, not work (with partnership, innovation, reliability, responsibility and great work)."

Another agency that used its outlandish persona to achieve a calculated result was Quaker City Mercantile. While much of the local advertising community was courting local companies, the Society Hill-based agency was out winning Puma Worldwide, R.J. Reynolds' Camel and Salem brands, William Grant & Sons (Glenfiddich Scotch whisky) and M&M/Mars. This year, it also pushed heavily into retail, with a line of Sailor Jerry Vodka and an Old City store that sells retro clothing. Like Tettemer, Quaker City Mercantile's driving force, CEO Stephen Grasse, projects a wild public image that camouflages the creatively charged, hard-driving atmosphere at the firm.

"Everyone works till 10 at night," Grasse said when interviewed in June. "Mistakes are not tolerated."

Meanwhile, in the city's media world, there were two major surprises - at the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia magazine. After a decade-long decline in circulation, the Inquirer reported that its weekday circulation rose 2.3 percent in the six months ended Sept. 30. For Sundays, circulation grew 2 percent.

The payoff could be the result of new leadership in the newsroom, with Walker Lundy notching his first year as executive editor. But it's likely to be a shared effort, with a more aggressive effort to build circulation by targeting selected ZIP codes in the suburbs.

On the advertising side, revenue at Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., the company that operates the Inquirer and Daily News, was down 4.6 percent for the first nine months of the year and off 1.7 percent for the third quarter.

At Philadelphia magazine, a steady turnover of editors did not damage the company's ability to sell ad pages. In the third quarter ended Sept. 30, Phillymag had booked 323.4 ad pages, up from 317.5 a year earlier. Year-to-date, the magazine was down slightly, at 877 pages vs. 909.9, for the first nine months of 2001.

What the page count doesn't tell you - and what Philadelphia magazine doesn't disclose - is the actual revenue generated by those pages sold and whether the rates were lower than a year ago.

Back at the agencies, the outlook was more tempered. Like 2001, plenty of firms struggled.

Earle Palmer Brown, which closed its Center City office in October 2001, in recent months pulled the plug on its last local operation, the Manayunk interactive agency Odyssey.

As recently as 1995, EPB was the city's largest agency, but a succession of mergers and changes in the parent company exposed its fault lines.

Late in the year, EPB was hit by a spate of lawsuits. Three radio-station owners sued the agency, claiming EPB failed to pay for air time for commercials. PNI also filed a lawsuit over nonpayment of bills for print advertising.

The only good news that came out of EPB's dissolution was that Judy Munroe, owner of Munroe Creative Partners in Center City, bought back the one-third share of her company that belonged to EPB.

Elsewhere, Beach Advertising, one of the most venerable agencies devoted to multicultural marketing, was reduced to a shell, laying off most of its staff. George Beach, who founded the agency three decades ago, vowed to fight on. (One of Beach's former executives, David Brown, most recently of Star-Rosen Group, stepped up, starting his own agency devoted to multicultural advertising, Brown Partners).

An agency that didn't weather the economic downturn was Manayunk-based Goose, which folded early in the year. For most agencies, there may have been a balance: accounts lost, accounts gained.

The city's largest agency, the venerable Tierney Communications, lost one of its major accounts, the Pennsylvania Lottery, worth $30 million in billings. But it collected several smaller accounts.

LevLane was one of a long line of agencies to get yanked from the Sovereign Bank account. It bounced back late in the year by winning over Beneficial Mutual Savings, one of several accounts acquired by Dudnyk after EPB folded.

Brownstein Group lost employees and a high-profile client, Krispy Kreme, but still managed to win a plum account: Microsoft Corp. The software giant consolidated work from dozens of agencies into a half-dozen, of which Brownstein was one. As a result, Brownstein's Seattle office prospered. Late in the year, Brownstein even signed longtime KYW-TV anchor Larry Kane to be a consultant; Kane planned a late-year retirement from TV news.

Neff + Associates of Old City survived a staff shakeout to sign several clients, including TenTen Race, Alpine Farms and Potamkin's Springfield Auto Mall division.

A number of agencies shifted their emphasis to public relations. And why not: PR is less labor-intensive than advertising, has lower production costs and, let's face it, is based on placing (free) stories rather than (costly) advertising.

In the realm of public relations, Karen Cutler of Tattar Cutler bolted for Star-Rosen. Tattar Cutler, in response, retooled to become Tattar Richards-DBC. Dorland decided to refocus on health care. Simon Public Relations, with a mix of clients, cleaned up in the Pepperpots, winning six of the Philadelphia Public Relations Association's annual awards. Star-Rosen in Cherry Hill pushed for PR work, picking up Bucks County Coffee and other clients, and claimed it had its best year ever.

In this era of corporate scandal, several firms delved more deeply into the crisis-management field, none more so than Anne Klein & Associates and Braithwaite Communications.

In this day and age, it may have been a wise move.

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Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) (formerly Quaker City Mercantile) Featured in Philadelphia Business Journal

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Look Who's Cool! Quaker City Mercantile

12/17/2002

Look Who's Cool! Quaker City Mercantile
12/17/2002

Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) shows Philly how to sell its hip side.

When it comes to promoting Philadelphia as a place to live, anti-establishment branding guru Steve Grasse doesn't think a traditional ad campaign would work.

"If you ran an ad in a magazine that said, 'Come to Philly,' no one would look at it," said Grasse, CEO of Center City ad agency Quaker City Mercantile.

"Whereas if I read in Spin magazine about all these cool artists and what they were doing in Philly, or maybe I read about the Space 1026 artists' collective down in Chinatown, then I'd start to think maybe it would be really cool to be from Philly."

This kind of marketing savvy is exactly what Urban Warrior was looking for when she invited four teams of advertising professionals to help her brainstorm ways to bring people back into the city and help make it grow. Quaker City Mercantile's focus on the young and "cool" crowd is a welcome change. After all, the idea that "brainy young people" are essential to successful cities - promoted by Carnegie Mellon prof Richard Florida - is now so mainstream that it's been cited by the New York Times as one of this year's 100 great ideas.

What follows are two full pages of color ads developed by Grasse and his team, with photos shot by skateboarding photographer Adam Wallacavage. But, Grasse cautions, the ads are just background. They'd have to be a part of a comprehensive marketing effort to highlight the city's counterculture and bring an aura of cool to otherwise gritty neighborhoods.

His title for the campaign?

"Philthy - The City That Bites You Back."

"Our solution would be to capture a taste of underground Philly and show how cool and fun it is," said Grasse. "Because once the cool people stay, the Wharton grads are soon to follow.

"It's a concept for Philadelphia's counterculture, taking the [city's] name and making it somewhat subversive," Grasse said. "It's a message that's aimed at the Khyber crowd, rather than the Kimmel crowd."

Grasse said the ads would underline a whole "Philthy" movement: Philthy nights at certain clubs, for instance, a Philthy fashion show and Philthy grants for young artists.

Finally, the launch should include a "Philthy Guide" to city life, featuring "110 places you can go to get Philthy."

"It would be a kind of Zagats for hipsters," Grasse said.

Grasse's "Gen-X" style plan seems edgy enough to raise eyebrows in a city known for establishment thinking.

But I think edge might be worth a shot, particularly if we are talking about attracting a generation of young people.

After all, do we always want to play second fiddle when it comes to urban cool? Why shouldn't cities like Boston, New Orleans and San Francisco get a little competition from this City of Brotherly Love?

"Philadelphia has a unique brand of style which you are not going to get anywhere else," Grasse said. "It's working-class attitude mixed with urban hipster. Very laid-back, but still very artistic. And I would argue that it rivals places like Brooklyn, which is very hip right now."


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Look Who's Cool! Quaker City Mercantile

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Financial Express Features Quaker City Mercantile's Unique Puma Campaign

11/04/2002

Financial Express Features Quaker City Mercantile's Unique Puma Campaign
11/04/02

"Puma Rolls Out Campaign With A Difference"
New Delhi: This is a print campaign with a difference. US-based sports and lifestyle brand Puma has just launched its global print campaign that has adopted animation as its style. Created by Quaker City Mercantile, the campaign will be used as a vehicle to introduce the brand's range that is due for launch in 2003.
The global campaign, which was launched simultaneously across the world in October, made its Indian debut in Cosmopolitan's anniversary issue last month and will appear in feature-related supplements in dailies also.
The campaign seeks to strengthen Puma's international positioning as the brand that 'mixes it up' and fuses the creative influences from the world of sports, lifestyle and fashion.
According to company sources, the campaign, which will continue to be created by Quaker City Mercantile, will be customised to the needs and interests of different countries.
Thus in India, the forthcoming cricket season may see a cricket-related animated ad series. It could even use Indian cricketers as animated characters, though a lot of endorsement issues would need to be tackled before this comes through. An animated series has been created with a storyline revolving around Adam Gilchrist of Australia.


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Financial Express Features Quaker City Mercantile's Unique Puma Campaign

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P&I Covers Quaker City Mercantile's Marketing for Puma

08/01/2002

P&I Covers Quaker City Mercantile's Marketing for Puma
08/01/02


Puma appoints Iris to boost its profile with kids

Sporting goods manufacturer Puma has appointed Iris to work on its below-the-line activity with the objective of raising the profile of the company. Iris will work alongside Puma's global advertising agency Quaker City Mercantile.

Puma is targeting 16 to 24 year-olds with activity that is due to kick off towards the end of this year. According to Ian Millner, Iris managing partner, the drive will include in-store pushes in high street sports shops as well as Puma's own stores.

"We will be elevating the profile of the brand through mechanics including POP, in store theatre and staff motivation programmes, he said. "Our work and experience in the sector convinced Puma that we were the right partner."


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P&I Covers Quaker City Mercantile's Marketing for Puma

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