News and Press

Behind the Lens: Puma Comes Back to Jamaica

03/01/2003

Behind the Lens: Puma Comes Back to Jamaica
03/01/2003

Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) campaign for Puma promotes the brand with Jamaican culture Olympic pride.

Quaker City Mercantile's latest campaign for Puma promotes the brand as if it had sponsored not just Jamaica's Olympic efforts but the whole country: tapping into the island nation's happy-go-lucky vibe, the four print ads currently running in magazine such as Details and Maxim show all kinds of people wearing Puma shoes and enjoying life. Gone are the surreal action shots that characterized Quaker City Mercantile's past work for Puma, also photographed by Warwick Saint. These Saint pictures portray a sense of fun that is accessible to a broader range of people. "I treated the whole thing like an editorial shoot," Saint says. "I tried to created something genuine...happy, but not contrived." Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) cast people off the street and set up four to five shots a day. Although many of the scenarios were sketched out beforehand, Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) president/creative director Steven Grasse says a certain amount of free association crept in. One of the more humorous: a man runs down a street with a Jamaican flag trailing behind. The kids in the background weren't planned, but their expressions seal the deal.

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Behind the Lens: Puma Comes Back to Jamaica

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ABRACADABRA! Puma!

01/13/2003

ABRACADABRA! Puma!
03/01/2003

A genie outfits runners with new shoes in recent TV work by Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) for Puma.

Ever want a genie in a magic lamp to outfit you with new shoes? Well, it happens in new TV work by Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) for Puma.

The effort celebrates Puma's signing last year of a multiyear sponsorship contract with the Jamaican National and Olympic teams.

One spot, which appears in 60-, 45-, 30- and 15-second versions and as a 30-second tease, shows a guy finding a lamp on the beach. After he rubs it, a dreadlocked genie appears. The man, who notices that the genie's Pumas are glittering, wishes for everyone in Jamaica to have Puma shoes.

The ad then shows Pumas magically appearing on people's feet-including a newborn baby and a woman ironing. At the end, the Puma logo is shown with the line, "Proud sponsor of the 2003 Jamaican Athletics Federation."

"We really strove for kind of a low-tech feel as opposed to having it be all overproduced," said Steven Grasse, creative director/CEO at Philadelphia-based Quaker City Mercantile.

The TV work was written by Grasse and directed by Lisa Rubish from Bob Industries in Los Angeles. The effort also includes print, which was shot by Warrick Saint.

The spot is airing in Europe, Asia and Australia. Print is running in the U.S. in the February issue of Details, among others.

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ABRACADABRA! Puma!

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All Business Features Quaker City Mercantile's Puma Campaign

01/06/2003

All Business Features Quaker City Mercantile's Puma Campaign
01/06/03

"Strategy: Puma Gets Running Start in 2003 With Worldwide Push for H. Street"
German-based athletic footwear and apparel company Puma will take on a Jamaican flair beginning this month in ads for H. Street, a new colorful running shoe designed for high-impact use on city streets and high school tracks.
The integrated TV and print campaign will run in North America, Europe and Asia, via Quaker City Mercantile, Philadelphia, but U.S. consumers will only see the print component. Budget was not disclosed. Puma spent $3.3 million in the U.S. from Jan.-Sept. 2002, per CMR.
The campaign builds on the relationship between the trendy athletic brand and the Jamaican people through the color, music and passion of the island's culture and Puma products. Puma last year signed a multi-year sponsorship contract with the Jamaican National and Olympic teams and will supply apparel and footwear through 2008.
Print breaks in the U.S. with four executions in March issues of Details, Black Book, Flaunt, Interview, The Fader, Vibe and Nylon. One image features two elderly Jamaican women dressed in their Sunday finest, complete with vibrant Puma H. Streets. Another shot shows an athlete running through the streets triumphantly carrying an oversized Jamaican flag wearing matching H. Streets.
The TV spot, which will air in 15-, 30-, 45- and 60-second versions, shows a Jamaican man strolling down the beach when he discovers a magic lamp and a hip Genie who grants his wish that everyone have a pair of shoes just like the Genie's vibrant H. Streets. Across the island, shoes are replaced, from the dancing feet of a gospel choir in rehearsal to a bus full of passengers and a woman at home ironing.
The tag reads, "Puma, the proud sponsor of the Jamaican National Team."
The unisex H Street shoes will be available this spring for $70.

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All Business Features Quaker City Mercantile's Puma Campaign

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Strategy: Puma Gets Running Start in 2003 With Worldwide Push for H. Street

01/06/2003

Strategy: Puma Gets Running Start in 2003 With Worldwide Push for H. Street
01/06/2003

German-based athletic footwear & apparel company Puma takes on a Jamaican flair.

German-based athletic footwear and apparel company Puma will take on a Jamaican flair beginning this month in ads for H. Street, a new colorful running shoe designed for high-impact use on city streets and high school tracks.

The integrated TV and print campaign will run in North America, Europe and Asia, via Quaker City Mercantile, Philadelphia, but U.S. consumers will only see the print component. Budget was not disclosed. Puma spent $3.3 million in the U.S. from Jan.-Sept. 2002, per CMR.

The campaign builds on the relationship between the trendy athletic brand and the Jamaican people through the color, music and passion of the island's culture and Puma products. Puma last year signed a multi-year sponsorship contract with the Jamaican National and Olympic teams and will supply apparel and footwear through 2008.

Print breaks in the U.S. with four executions in March issues of Details, Black Book, Flaunt, Interview, The Fader, Vibe and Nylon. One image features two elderly Jamaican women dressed in their Sunday finest, complete with vibrant Puma H. Streets. Another shot shows an athlete running through the streets triumphantly carrying an oversized Jamaican flag wearing matching H. Streets.

The TV spot, which will air in 15-, 30-, 45- and 60-second versions, shows a Jamaican man strolling down the beach when he discovers a magic lamp and a hip Genie who grants his wish that everyone have a pair of shoes just like the Genie's vibrant H. Streets. Across the island, shoes are replaced, from the dancing feet of a gospel choir in rehearsal to a bus full of passengers and a woman at home ironing.

The tag reads, "Puma, the proud sponsor of the Jamaican National Team."

The unisex H Street shoes will be available this spring for $70.

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Strategy: Puma Gets Running Start in 2003 With Worldwide Push for H. Street

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NY Times Hendrick's Gin Recipe

01/05/2003

NY Times Hendrick's Gin Recipe
01/05/03

"Hendrick's Gin Gibson"

Ingredients
* 3 ounces of Hendrick's gin
* A touch of dry vermouth
* Cocktail onions
Preparation
1. Chill martini glass. Fill shaker with ice. Pour in gin. Add vermouth. Cover and shake.
2. Put several cocktail onions on a stick and place in chilled glass. Pour cocktail over onions and serve.

YIELD
1 serving

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NY Times Hendrick's Gin Recipe

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Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) (formerly Quaker City Mercantile) Featured in Philadelphia Business Journal

01/03/2003

Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) (formerly Quaker City Mercantile) Featured in Philadelphia Business Journal
01/03/2003

Flux was the buzzword for publications and agencies this year.

The past year for the marketing and media industries was, in a word, challenging. Like the economy in general, though, unexpected players seemed to emerge from the pack.

Case in point: Agencies like Red Tettemer and Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) continued to grow.

Red Tettemer leveraged its work for Comcast into work for New York-based Cablevision. It dominated the Philadelphia Ad Club's Addy awards, picking up 11. It also moved from Narberth into one of the more unusual agency headquarters, converting John Wanamaker's opulent, two-story penthouse suite atop One South Broad, filling it with thrift-shop furniture and eBay art and creating offices by using aluminum-and-glass "store fronts."

Ed Tettemer, the wild-haired president of the agency, cultivates an image of eccentricity. Staffers are required to learn his 11 rules of advertising, one of which is, "Own the client, not work (with partnership, innovation, reliability, responsibility and great work)."

Another agency that used its outlandish persona to achieve a calculated result was Quaker City Mercantile. While much of the local advertising community was courting local companies, the Society Hill-based agency was out winning Puma Worldwide, R.J. Reynolds' Camel and Salem brands, William Grant & Sons (Glenfiddich Scotch whisky) and M&M/Mars. This year, it also pushed heavily into retail, with a line of Sailor Jerry Vodka and an Old City store that sells retro clothing. Like Tettemer, Quaker City Mercantile's driving force, CEO Stephen Grasse, projects a wild public image that camouflages the creatively charged, hard-driving atmosphere at the firm.

"Everyone works till 10 at night," Grasse said when interviewed in June. "Mistakes are not tolerated."

Meanwhile, in the city's media world, there were two major surprises - at the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia magazine. After a decade-long decline in circulation, the Inquirer reported that its weekday circulation rose 2.3 percent in the six months ended Sept. 30. For Sundays, circulation grew 2 percent.

The payoff could be the result of new leadership in the newsroom, with Walker Lundy notching his first year as executive editor. But it's likely to be a shared effort, with a more aggressive effort to build circulation by targeting selected ZIP codes in the suburbs.

On the advertising side, revenue at Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., the company that operates the Inquirer and Daily News, was down 4.6 percent for the first nine months of the year and off 1.7 percent for the third quarter.

At Philadelphia magazine, a steady turnover of editors did not damage the company's ability to sell ad pages. In the third quarter ended Sept. 30, Phillymag had booked 323.4 ad pages, up from 317.5 a year earlier. Year-to-date, the magazine was down slightly, at 877 pages vs. 909.9, for the first nine months of 2001.

What the page count doesn't tell you - and what Philadelphia magazine doesn't disclose - is the actual revenue generated by those pages sold and whether the rates were lower than a year ago.

Back at the agencies, the outlook was more tempered. Like 2001, plenty of firms struggled.

Earle Palmer Brown, which closed its Center City office in October 2001, in recent months pulled the plug on its last local operation, the Manayunk interactive agency Odyssey.

As recently as 1995, EPB was the city's largest agency, but a succession of mergers and changes in the parent company exposed its fault lines.

Late in the year, EPB was hit by a spate of lawsuits. Three radio-station owners sued the agency, claiming EPB failed to pay for air time for commercials. PNI also filed a lawsuit over nonpayment of bills for print advertising.

The only good news that came out of EPB's dissolution was that Judy Munroe, owner of Munroe Creative Partners in Center City, bought back the one-third share of her company that belonged to EPB.

Elsewhere, Beach Advertising, one of the most venerable agencies devoted to multicultural marketing, was reduced to a shell, laying off most of its staff. George Beach, who founded the agency three decades ago, vowed to fight on. (One of Beach's former executives, David Brown, most recently of Star-Rosen Group, stepped up, starting his own agency devoted to multicultural advertising, Brown Partners).

An agency that didn't weather the economic downturn was Manayunk-based Goose, which folded early in the year. For most agencies, there may have been a balance: accounts lost, accounts gained.

The city's largest agency, the venerable Tierney Communications, lost one of its major accounts, the Pennsylvania Lottery, worth $30 million in billings. But it collected several smaller accounts.

LevLane was one of a long line of agencies to get yanked from the Sovereign Bank account. It bounced back late in the year by winning over Beneficial Mutual Savings, one of several accounts acquired by Dudnyk after EPB folded.

Brownstein Group lost employees and a high-profile client, Krispy Kreme, but still managed to win a plum account: Microsoft Corp. The software giant consolidated work from dozens of agencies into a half-dozen, of which Brownstein was one. As a result, Brownstein's Seattle office prospered. Late in the year, Brownstein even signed longtime KYW-TV anchor Larry Kane to be a consultant; Kane planned a late-year retirement from TV news.

Neff + Associates of Old City survived a staff shakeout to sign several clients, including TenTen Race, Alpine Farms and Potamkin's Springfield Auto Mall division.

A number of agencies shifted their emphasis to public relations. And why not: PR is less labor-intensive than advertising, has lower production costs and, let's face it, is based on placing (free) stories rather than (costly) advertising.

In the realm of public relations, Karen Cutler of Tattar Cutler bolted for Star-Rosen. Tattar Cutler, in response, retooled to become Tattar Richards-DBC. Dorland decided to refocus on health care. Simon Public Relations, with a mix of clients, cleaned up in the Pepperpots, winning six of the Philadelphia Public Relations Association's annual awards. Star-Rosen in Cherry Hill pushed for PR work, picking up Bucks County Coffee and other clients, and claimed it had its best year ever.

In this era of corporate scandal, several firms delved more deeply into the crisis-management field, none more so than Anne Klein & Associates and Braithwaite Communications.

In this day and age, it may have been a wise move.

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Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) (formerly Quaker City Mercantile) Featured in Philadelphia Business Journal

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