News and Press

The Empire Strikes Back

03/02/2007

Steven Grasse is the sort of salesman who could make John Prescott seem to possess a brain, or Basra appear a fashionable holiday destination.

While possessing no discernible gifts as a writer or historian, after a lifetime in marketing Mr Grasse is storming America with a work entitled The Evil Empire: 101 Ways In Which England Has Ruined The World.

Out there in Little Rock and Grand Falls, it seems, they are lapping up this catalogue of British crimes and follies, from the Industrial Revolution (which caused pollution and global warming) to the Opium Wars (giving rise to drug addiction).

World War I was our fault because Germany wanted an Empire like ours; so was the rise of Nazism, thanks to British prewar appeasers sucking up to Hitler.

In Mr Grasse's book, poor old Britain is to blame for world poverty, Islamic terrorism (we created Saddam), even the Vietnam War - because we set the world trend for colonial expansion and the war would never have happened had the country not been a French colony.

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With Friends Like Strategy Page, Evil Empire Doesn't Need Enemies

03/02/2007

"Cruel Britannia"

ccording to a new book - "The Evil Empire: 101 Ways That England Ruined The World" (the author obviously not knowing the difference between "England" and "Great Britain") - Britain is an evil nation responsible for many of the world's woes.

Written by Amercian Steven Grasse, Britain must pay £31 trillion ($60 trillion) in damages (to put that into persective, the US economy, the world's largest, is $13 trillion). Grasse even has an organisation to do with all this - The International Coalition for British Reparations - of which there are many members.
- Charles Laurence

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PW Article Gets Quaker City Mercantile (formerly known as Gyro Worldwide) More "Free Press" with ICBR Comment

02/27/2007

"Stealth Jihad"
1. On Jan 6, 2009 at 08:42AM

"Wow what a boring wank job you are. A Johnny one-note who keeps tapping f sharp hoping people will finally start humming along. Wells, I have a story assignment for you. I know you think I'm a dumb Septic and have no business assigning stories to majestic, imperious writers for the Grauniad but hear me out. Go interview a chap named Steven Grasse. He runs British Reparations, a Philly outfit. That's right, he's right in your coverage area. (What could be better???) Dude's even got a book out. You need to get out more. You need to talk to real Yanks. Yanks who understand what a shithole England is and can talk back to you. Grasse is one of those guys. So there's your assignment. I won't even take a fee on this. You can thank me later."
- "The Guardian Sucks"

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Steven Grasse uses ICBR to promote Evil Empire

02/23/2007

Remember my post about the Horrid British Empire? Well it seems that some people are out for revenge and want Britain to pay just about everyone else in the world for its evil deeds.

While my post was a bit of fun, I reckon this lot might be serious. That said, their web site will surely make you laugh, so I think this counts as a Friday Funny.

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The Daily Pennsylvanian Evaluates ICBR

02/14/2007

"A $58 trillion call for British Reparations"

"People of the world, it's time to get paid."
So reads the motto for the International Coalition for British Reparations, founded by Philadelphia advertising executive Steven Grasse.

Claiming that Britain is responsible for all the world's troubles, the ICBR wants the British government to pay reparations equaling a total of $58 trillion to be distributed equally to every man, woman and child on earth - except, of course, the British.

Because the British, the ICBR alleges, are to blame for all the world's bad inventions, including - but not limited to - genocide, machine guns and the Black Plague.

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Tattoo art flows into mainstream ads

02/09/2007

Corporations tap into pop culture, call on tattoo artists to help their brands gain an edge with younger consumers and convey a sense of originality.

Tattoos--once considered outlaw art--have seeped from the skin of consumers into the fabric of advertising and marketing.

First trendy and now common as a form of personal expression, tattoos are popping up in magazine and online ads to sell a range of mass-appeal products looking to communicate an image of hipness or edginess, or just to stand out.

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